Covid-19: Mixed Messages & Mistrust (Information Series Part III)

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During the CoronaVirus pandemic, we have witnessed various examples of misinfomation and narrative “flip-flopping” from a number of governing bodies, leading to confusion and a growing public mistrust of policy decisions.

Endless Examples of Misinformation

Since the start of this current health crisis, we’ve seen endless examples of misinformation from various bodies. This feeds the mistrust of many official information channels. Sometimes with good reason, but often to our detriment.

It’s also an opportunity to exploit fears and vulnerabilities. This pushes an agenda that benefits a small minority.

Common Misleading Statements

Whether it was at the outset of the publicity surrounding the Coronavirus, with common misleading statements that it was “a mere ‘flu” to current claims that certain jurisdictions have the virus “well under control”, lines of misinformation create confusion at best. Ultimately however, they harm society.

Mixed Messages

We need to address the mixed messages and information without basis, and allow doctors, researchers, academics and scientists to construct an impartial view of the disease:

  • What it looks like
  • How it spreads
  • How to combat it
  • How to eradicate it

We need free-flow of quality information, quantitative research and the sharing of ideas: a platform where scientists can publish their research objectively, without it being manipulated by others looking to exploit the current crisis.

Freely Distribute Information

KnowledgeArc aims to provide a way to freely distribute information, without it being censored or filtered. And without silencing those who speak the truth. People need a source of truth, a trust-less mechanism to validate and verify the veracity of information. Especially as we see the rise of #deepfake and other mechanisms of truth subversion.

KnowledgeArc Network is working towards this goal using peer-to-peer decentralized storage and blockchain technology. It aims to provide a linkage back to the original source of information: research, findings, discoveries, and opinions. These will all be immutable and permanent on the blockchain.

Misinformation Will Be Easily Identified, Tracked And Isolated

We build on IPFS, OrbitDB and Ethereum: all information is verified for authenticity and integrity. Users are able to build tools around this technology stack, to collate information around similar topics. These collection (or subject) repositories allow people to disseminate information about issues such as the Coronavirus, without the truth being blurred or filtered. Misinformation is be easily identified, tracked and isolated.

In the meantime, look to our scientific and medical experts for an objective picture of the current crisis. Listen instead to trusted institutions such as our universities to collect, collate and verify important information that can be relied on by the wider global community.

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The Tokenomics of Knowledge

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Academic research is a noble cause which adds to the repository of public knowledge. But those who undertake academic research take on a lot of personal responsibility and, ultimately, a lot of risk.

  • Risky research can result in career ruin
  • Costly research may fail to raise the necessary funding
  • New discoveries may supersede existing findings

Creators should be directly incentivised to push the boundaries of human knowledge, but existing processes financially reward the big players while the authors generally miss out.

What if there was a way for researchers to recuperate personal and financial costs directly? Maybe even generate revenue from their work? Could researchers generate financial value from their work, even during the research process?

Research Tokenomics

Tokenomics introduces a new method of revenue generation or self-funding without the need of an intermediary or “middle-man”. In a similar way that cryptocurrencies take the bank out of the middle of a transaction between parties, research tokenisation would take corporate funders and publishers out of the academic process.

Micro-Payments for Cited Work

One example of this would be micro-payments for cited work. When an author publishes his/her work, the findings of that work is often used by other researchers in their studies, to validate certain assumptions – building upon the work of others rather than having to create concepts from scratch.

Research tokenomics would transfer a small amount of tokens to the original authors of the work every time it is referenced. The more useful or applicable the research, the more it is cited and the more tokens the authors can expect to earn. (Think of BAT* for content producers but in the academic space.)

(*BAT is Brave browser’s token. You can earn BAT by either watching ads or by authoring content. Others can contribute BAT when they consume content. This can either be a one-off payment or some kind of ongoing subscription. Instead of Google getting revenue for you consuming ads, or for you posting your content to Facebook who then monetise it, the end users are directly rewarded.)

The KnowledgeArc Network platform deploys smart contracts which track the citations of academic works and generate tokens, which are paid out to the original producers.

Researchers Could Raise Tokens Before Research Completed

Potentially, researchers could even raise tokens before and during the research process, introducing a funding dimension to the tokenomic model.

Ultimately, authors would be able to be rewarded for the huge burden they take on as creators of knowledge.

Find out more about how KnowledgeArc Network is revolutionising how researchers can directly profit from their work.

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