Taking back ownership of your data

The convenience of hosted solutions for digital assets and archiving can hide a major problem; do you control the data you own? KnowledgeArc.Network’s decentralized architecture ensures you are in full control of your data.

Do you really own your data?

Hosting digital assets in the cloud has become a popular and cost-effective solution. But what happens when you decide the host you are with is no longer providing the level of service you expect?

You may think migration is as simple as your existing host dumping the data out to a backup file and making it available for your new provider to restore. Unfortunately, the reality isn’t that simple; closed source applications often have proprietary formats which make them difficult or even impossible to import into other systems.

On the other hand, some open source systems are customized, but the customizations might not be publicly available, so backups only capture a subset of your data. For example, there are archive hosting providers who have built multi-tenant data storage on top of a single application. Databases in such a system cannot simply be lifted and re-implemented on other infrastructure. This results in broken features and crucial data being excluded from the system.

Even if migrating from one system to another runs smoothly, complex backups and time-consuming debugging are often required. Export/import tools need constant maintenance, but with niche products such as digital asset systems, maintenance of these ancillary tools can often be ignored.

A distributed solution

The KnowledgeArc.Network platform makes centralized storage obsolete. Data is replicated in multiple locations whilst still being owned of the original creator.

Replication allows application managers, developers and system administrators to build a variety of user experiences on top of the data. There is no need to set up complex data structures, import and export data, or work around missing data. Instead, the user simply replicates an existing database and works directly on top of it.

Data can also remain private even though it is stored in a public way. By encrypting data, the owner is the only one with access to this information and can grant other users varying degrees of control. For example, perhaps certain users might only be able to read data. Others might be able to update existing data but not delete it.

Centralized vs decentralized

Recently there has been a move to more centralized archiving solutions. Instead of disparate systems talking to one another or federated systems being established to support a “go-to” repository of information, a number of governments and bureaucracies are pushing for everything to be centralized. This results in a stagnation of innovation and, more importantly, a single point of failure.

Figure 1: Legacy Archives

KnowledgeArc.Network decentralized databases will capture the best of both worlds; every archive is unique but their records can easily be merged into a single, federated archive. This federated archive can then be replicated further so that multiple user interfaces can be created on top of the same data.

KnowledgeArc.Network captures the best of every model. Decentralized, independent databases provide institutions with full control and ownership of their data. Federated archives simply merge distributed databases into a single data store. And, finally, the entire community can build their own user experiences on top of any archived data by simply replicating an existing database.

Figure 2: Decentralized Archive

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