What Covid-19 Has Taught Us About Knowledge Management (Information Series Part II)

One thing the Coronavirus outbreak has shown us is that getting quality information based on quantitative-based research and professional recommendations is key to ensure the public is well-informed, and fully educated about a wide-scale health issue (or any issue for that matter).

Photo by 🇨🇭 Claudio Schwarz | @purzlbaum on Unsplash

Subject repositories (or discipline repositories) attempt to collect information based on academic research, about a particular subject or area of interest. They provide a one-stop for quality information, collating educational material, findings and other supporting documentation in a single location. Subject repositories should use well-researched scholarly information and this information should be verified for authenticity and its source should be easily tracked.

Subject repositories are even more important in a decentralised world. Information could be stored and hosted across a number of disparate systems – this is perfect for circumventing the influence over information by nefarious parties who are looking to either control the narrative, or benefit from either playing up or playing down its impact… But by its very nature, decentralised data is difficult to find, search across and extricate meaningful conclusions.

In a decentralised world, subject repositories will be the gathering points for various information from a wide range of sources. It will be more important than ever to attach a pseudonymous path to the original material to ensure both the integrity and truthfulness of the data while also ensuring that the privacy of the source is protected, especially in regimes which single out or punish purveyors of quality, scientific information.

KnowledgeArc Network offers some mind-blowing alternatives to the way ‘the asset of knowledge’ has been managed to date…

When data is archived on a blockchain the information remains:

1. Immutable – the data can never be changed or corrupted

2. Persistent – it will last forever

3. Unique – there is no other information like this, it’s the single source

4. Open – the data is publicly accessible so others can build on the knowledge created

Come +Follow KnowledgeArc Network on LinkedIn for the latest tech and team articles, giving information-power (and potentially tokens) back to the academic researcher and ultimately the communities (who need it most).

One Reply to “What Covid-19 Has Taught Us About Knowledge Management (Information Series Part II)”

  1. Decentralised data archives will also be their nature allow the public at large to see the voracity of the research and hopefully reduce the FUD (fear, uncertainty and doubt) factor that causes manipulated friction! Uplevelling the management of knowledge in this way sounds like no brainier way to go!!!!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *